Spreading Good News (Post 503 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH: A World Without the Inventions of Black People)

The goal of Spreading Good News is for readers to:

GET INSPIRED and/or GET MOTIVATED and/or GET INFORMED and/or GET AWE-STRUCK and/or GET A BREAK FROM ALL THE NEGATIVE NEWS and to tell readers about our good, short books and our online store.

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CONSTANT QUOTE

 

 

IT’S BETTER TO DIE CHASING A DREAM NEVER CAUGHT THAN TO DIE NEVER HAVING CHASED THE DREAM.  ~ Joyce Fields

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PLEASE GOD AND EVERYTHING ELSE WILL FALL INTO PLACE.  ~ Joyce Fields

 
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TODAY’S BLOG

We all should know more about the contributions that African-Americans have made in the fields of science and medicine, as well as art, music, the written word, sports, and just-everyday life.

In honor of “Black History Month,” I will be Spreading Good News with daily posts of informative, educational, entertaining pieces about Black History.

I hope you enjoy this piece!

BLACK HISTORY MONTH

A World Without the Inventions of Black People

~ Author Unknown


This is a story of a little boy who woke up one morning and asked his mother, “Ma, did black people invent anything for the world?”  Well, his mother thought about that for a moment, and then said, “Billy, follow me around today and let’s just see what it would be like if there were no inventions by black people.  Now go get dressed, and we will get started.”

Billy ran to his room to put on his clothes and shoes.  His mother took one look at him and said, “Where are your shoes? And those clothes are all wrinkled, son.  I must iron them.”  However, when she reached for the ironing board, it was no longer there.

You see Sarah Boone, a black woman, invented the ironing board, and Jan E. Matzelinger, a black man, invented the shoe lasting machine.

“Oh, well,” she said, “please go and do something to your hair.”  He ran in his room to comb his hair, but the comb was not there.  You see, Walter Sammons, a black man, invented the comb.

Billy decided to just brush his hair, but the brush was gone, too.  You see Lydia O. Newman, a black female, invented the brush.

Well, this was a sight:  no shoes, wrinkled clothes, hair a mess.  Even Mom’s hair, without the hair care inventions of Madam C. J. Walker. . .well, you get the picture.

Mom told Billy, “Let’s do our chores around the house and then take a trip to the grocery store.”  Billy’s job was to sweep the floor.  He swept and swept and swept.  When he reached for the dustpan, it was not there.  You see, Lloyd P. Ray, a black man, invented the dustpan.

So he swept his pile of dirt over to the corner and left it there.  He then decided to mop the floor, but the mop was gone.  You see, Thomas W. Stewart, a black man, invented the mop.  Billy yelled to his Mom, “Ma, I’m not having any luck.”

“Well, son,” she said, “Let me finish washing these clothes, and we will prepare a list for the grocery store.”  When the wash finished, she went to place the clothes in the dryer, but it was not there.  You see, George T. Samon, a black man, invented the clothes dryer.

Mom asked Billy to go get a pencil and some paper to prepare their list for the market.  So, Billy ran for the paper and pencil but noticed the pencil lead was broken.  Well, he was out of luck because John Love, a black man, invented the pencil sharpener.

Mom reached for a pen, but it was not there because William Purvis, a black man, invented the fountain pen.

As a matter of fact, Lee Burridge, a black man, invented the typewriting machine and W. A. Lovette, a black man, invented the advanced printing press.  Billy and his mother decided just to head out to the market.

Well, when Billy opened the door, he noticed the grass was as high as he was tall. You see, John Burr, a black man, invented the lawn mower.

They made their way over to the car and found that it just wouldn’t go.  You see, Richard Spikes, a black man, invented the automatic gearshift, and Joseph Gammel, a black man, invented the supercharge system for internal combustion engines.  They also noticed that the few cars that were moving were running into each other and having wrecks because there were no traffic signals.  You see, Garrett A. Morgan, a black man, invented the traffic light.

Well, it was getting late, so they walked to the market, got their groceries, and returned home.  Just when they were about to put away the milk, eggs, and butter, they noticed the refrigerator was gone.  You see John Standard, a black man, invented the refrigerator.  So, they just left the food on the counter.

By this time, Billy noticed he was getting mighty cold.  Mom went to turn up the heat, and what do you know?  No heat!  Alice Parker, a black female, invented the central heating furnace.  And in the summertime, they would have been out of luck trying to cool the house because Frederick Jones, a black man, invented the air conditioner.

It was almost time for Billy’s father to arrive home.  He usually takes the bus, but there was no bus, because its precursor was the electric trolley, invented by another black man, Elbert R. Robinson.

He usually takes the elevator from his office on the 20th floor, but there was no elevator because Alexander Miles, a black man, invented the elevator.

He also usually dropped off the office mail at a nearby mailbox, but it was no longer there because Philip Downing, a black man, invented the letter drop mailbox, and William Barry invented the postmarking and canceling machine.

Billy and his mother sat at the kitchen table with their heads in their hands. When the father arrived, he asked, “Why are you sitting in the dark?”  Why?  Because Lewis Howard Latimer, a black man, invented the filament within the light bulb.

Billy quickly learned more about what it would be like if there were no inventions by black people in the world, especially if he were ever sick and needed blood.  Dr. Charles Drew, a black scientist, found a way to preserve and store blood, which led to his starting the world’s first blood bank.

Well, what if a family member had to have heart surgery?  This would not have been possible without Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, a black doctor, who performed the first successful open-heart surgery.

So, if you ever wonder, like Billy, “where would we be without the inventions of black people?” think about these inventors and their inventions—and these are just a few!

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What’s YOUR take on this piece?

 

NOTE FROM JOYCEIf you enjoyed and/or learned from this blog, please leave a comment and send the link to others.  Thanks!!

If you’re interested in reading all about “My Breast Cancer Journey,” those posts start with post #334.

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~ Joyce Fields

 

ADDITIONAL OFFERINGS FROM JOYCE FIELDS

Joyce is an author who has written seven books.  If you enjoy this blog, you will, undoubtedly, enjoy all her books.  Her sister, Anita, is also an author.

BE INSPIRED!  You can read about and order their books AND order merchandise from their online store at this link (or click the “BE INSPIRED!” button above):

https://lineofserenity.wordpress.com/get-more-inspiration/

Thanks for your interest AND support!!

Contact Joyce at goodshortbooks@yahoo.com.

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SOME OF JOYCE’S FAVORITE BLOGS

I visit these blogs and leave comments regularly.  I think you will enjoy them all!

http://www.lenasledgeblog.com  Books, reviews, give-aways, interviews.

http://living4bliss.com  Believing Life Is Set up for Success (BLISS)

http://goss-coaching.com/author/gosscoaching  A professional writer and wellness coach helping people connect thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and action to create optimal health and a vibrant life.

http://www.thebirkineffect.com  Musings of a “want it all” 21st century woman

http://www.thesweetsensations.com  A baking, entertainment, and lifestyle blog.  Fantastic recipes and food photography, too!

http://www.pennilessparenting.com  A rich life on minimum wage.  Plus fabulous, healthful recipes!

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About Line of Serenity (Joyce Fields)

As a thought leader for today's generation, I choose to be part of the solution and am doing things that positively impact people's lives. In addition to being a happy, married (since 1967!) woman, sister, aunt, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, I have over 40 years' experience in "Corporate America": Stenographer, Secretary, Supervisor, Analyst, Office Manager, Executive Assistant. I am also a professional proofreader and the author of eight books (seven non-fiction; one children's fiction--http://www.GoodShortBooks.com).
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6 Responses to Spreading Good News (Post 503 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH: A World Without the Inventions of Black People)

  1. Nita says:

    Wonderful! Some of these I was aware of…several of them were news to me. Thanks for enhancing my knowledge! Good article.

  2. living4bliss says:

    Hurray.

    All people have contributed to technology and its time that everyone knew that we invented more than just peanut butter.

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