Spreading Good News (Post 512 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH: First African American U. S. Senator, Edward W. Brooke III)

The goal of Spreading Good News is for readers to:

GET INSPIRED and/or GET MOTIVATED and/or GET INFORMED and/or GET AWE-STRUCK and/or GET A BREAK FROM ALL THE NEGATIVE NEWS and to tell readers about our good, short books and our online store.

CLICK THE “FOLLOW” LINK ABOVE TO RECEIVE AN E-MAIL ALERT FOR EACH NEW, DAILY POST!!

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CONSTANT QUOTE

 

 

IT’S BETTER TO DIE CHASING A DREAM NEVER CAUGHT THAN TO DIE NEVER HAVING CHASED THE DREAM.  ~ Joyce Fields

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My late Aunt Yetty used to say:  “YOU AIN’T SO SLICK THAT YOU CAINT STAND ANOTHER GREASIN’”

 

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TODAY’S BLOG

We all should know more about the contributions that African-Americans have made in the fields of science and medicine, as well as art, music, the written word, sports, and just-everyday life.

In honor of “Black History Month,” I will be Spreading Good News with daily posts of informative, educational, entertaining pieces about Black History.

I hope you enjoy this piece!

BLACK HISTORY MONTH: First African American U. S. Senator, Edward W. Brooke III

Edward William Brooke III is the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate.  Brooke, an African American, Protestant, Republican, won elective office in the overwhelmingly white, Catholic, Democratic state of Massachusetts and emerged as a leader in the U.S. Senate.  Edward Brooke III, the son of Helen (Seldon) Brooke and Edward W. Brooke, was born October 26, 1919 in Washington, D.C.  Brook’s father, Edward, earned a law degree at the Howard University School of Law and later served as an attorney with the U.S. Veteran’s Administration.

After his graduation from Howard University in 1941, Edward Brooke III served as an officer in the Army with the all-African American 366th Combat Infantry Regiment.  He fought in Italy during World War II and won a Bronze Star for leading an attack on a German artillery battery.  While in Italy, he met his first wife, Remigia Ferrari-Scacco.  After serving as a combat officer, Brooke entered Boston University Law School and graduated in 1948.

Although Brooke did not vote prior to the age of 30, his friends were able to persuade him to enter politics.  Brooke ran in both Democratic and Republican primaries in 1950 for the Massachusetts legislature.  He lost the Democratic nomination but won the Republican nod.  He was defeated in general elections for the legislature in 1950 and in 1952.

In 1960, he ran as the Republican candidate for Secretary of State, becoming the first African American in Massachusetts to be nominated for a statewide office. He received over one million votes but lost by fewer than 12,000 to Kevin White.

In his fourth try for elective office, Brooke won the Attorney General’s race in 1962, becoming the first elected African American Attorney General of any state in American history.  He won again in 1964.  As Attorney General, Brooke gained a reputation as a vigorous prosecutor of organized crime and for his coordination of local police departments in the highly publicized Boston Strangler case between 1962 and 1964.

In 1966 Brooke ran for the U.S. Senate, defeating former Governor Endicott Peabody.  He served two terms in the Senate from January 3, 1967, to January 3, 1979.  While in the Senate, Brooke co-authored the 1968 Fair Housing Act.  Brooke also supported anti-poverty legislation and called for strengthening Social Security, increasing the minimum wage, and funding Medicare.

In 1969, Brooke broke ranks with President Richard Nixon, a fellow Republican, because he believed the President’s Supreme Court nominee Clement Haynsworth was a segregationist.  Brooke led a bipartisan coalition that defeated Haynsworth’s nomination.  A few months later, he again organized sufficient Republican support to defeat Nixon’s second Supreme Court nominee, Harold Carswell, who had also voiced support for racial segregation.  On November 4, 1973, Brooke became the first Republican to call on President Nixon to resign because of the Watergate scandal.

Brooke divorced his first wife in 1978 and married Anne Fleming in 1979.  After leaving the Senate, he practiced law in Washington, D.C.  In 2004, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush, and in 2009 he received the Congressional Gold Medal.

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What are your thoughts on this piece?

 

NOTE FROM JOYCEIf you enjoyed and/or learned from this blog, please leave a comment and send the link to others.  Thanks!!

If you’re interested in reading all about “My Breast Cancer Journey,” those posts start with post #334.

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~ Joyce Fields

 

ADDITIONAL OFFERINGS FROM JOYCE FIELDS

Joyce is an author who has written seven books.  If you enjoy this blog, you will, undoubtedly, enjoy all her books.  Her sister, Anita, is also an author.

BE INSPIRED!  You can read about and order their books AND order merchandise from their online store at this link (or click the “BE INSPIRED!” button above):

https://lineofserenity.wordpress.com/get-more-inspiration/

Thanks for your interest AND support!!

Contact Joyce at goodshortbooks@yahoo.com.

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SOME OF JOYCE’S FAVORITE BLOGS

I visit these blogs and leave comments regularly.  I think you will enjoy them all!

http://www.lenasledgeblog.com  Books, reviews, give-aways, interviews.

http://living4bliss.com  Believing Life Is Set up for Success (BLISS)

http://goss-coaching.com/author/gosscoaching  A professional writer and wellness coach helping people connect thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and action to create optimal health and a vibrant life.

http://www.thebirkineffect.com  Musings of a “want it all” 21st century woman

http://www.thesweetsensations.com  A baking, entertainment, and lifestyle blog.  Fantastic recipes and food photography, too!

http://www.pennilessparenting.com  A rich life on minimum wage.  Plus fabulous, healthful recipes!

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About Line of Serenity (Joyce Fields)

As a thought leader for today's generation, I choose to be part of the solution and am doing things that positively impact people's lives. In addition to being a happy, married (since 1967!) woman, sister, aunt, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, I have over 40 years' experience in "Corporate America": Stenographer, Secretary, Supervisor, Analyst, Office Manager, Executive Assistant. I am also a professional proofreader and the author of eight books (seven non-fiction; one children's fiction--http://www.GoodShortBooks.com).
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10 Responses to Spreading Good News (Post 512 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH: First African American U. S. Senator, Edward W. Brooke III)

  1. awesome post! Keep up the awesome work!

  2. Jamie Holts says:

    I really like that one. Keep up the good work on your blog.

  3. living4bliss says:

    I am learning so much about our heritage from you.

    As you know, I was very affected in my childhood by the fair housing act. We were able to integrate our neighborhood and school district in 1969 due to the fair housing act.

    I had no idea who wrote it though.

    Thank you once again.

  4. Fatcow says:

    Truly wonderful reading. I would be happy to read some more posts about black history.

  5. Pingback: Broken Gold Denver

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