Spreading Good News (Post 522 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH: First African American Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Ralph J. Bunche)

The goal of Spreading Good News is for readers to:

GET INSPIRED and/or GET MOTIVATED and/or GET INFORMED and/or GET AWE-STRUCK and/or GET A BREAK FROM ALL THE NEGATIVE NEWS and to tell readers about our good, short books and our online store.

CLICK THE “FOLLOW” LINK ABOVE TO RECEIVE AN E-MAIL ALERT FOR EACH NEW, DAILY POST!!

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CONSTANT QUOTE

 

 

IT’S BETTER TO DIE CHASING A DREAM NEVER CAUGHT THAN TO DIE NEVER HAVING CHASED THE DREAM.  ~ Joyce Fields

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A SPOILED CHILD CREATES AN ANXIOUS PARENT.  ~ Joyce Fields

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Candle-Lighter Award

 

Thank you very much to www.living4bliss.wordpress.com for presenting me with the Candle-Lighter Award.  I truly appreciate the recognition!

The Candle-Lighter Award is an award for a blog or post that is positive and brings light into the world.

I started this “Good News” blog in July 2010 because I was tired of and disgusted by all the negative news and information.  I wanted to give people positive news and information.  I’m having a great time looking for, receiving, and posting these pieces!  Stay tuned!!

RULES

Whenever you see a blog or post you think brightens the world, give the blogger the Candle-Lighter Award.

Recipients can accept or decline. What does the recipient have to do?  Simply accept and nothing more!  You can paste this image on your blog, if you wish, and you are done!  If you wish to honor someone else with a Candle, pass it on, anytime and as many times and to as many people as you wish.

Come on and help me brighten up all our lives!

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TODAY’S BLOG

We all should know more about the contributions that African-Americans have made in the fields of science and medicine, as well as art, music, the written word, sports, and just-everyday life.

In honor of “Black History Month,” I will be Spreading Good News with daily posts of informative, educational, entertaining pieces about Black History.

I hope you enjoy this piece!

BLACK HISTORY MONTH:  First African American Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Ralph J. Bunche

 

Ralph Johnson Bunche (August 7, 1904-1971) was born in Detroit, Michigan.  His father, Fred Bunche, was a barber in a shop having a clientele of whites only; his mother, Olive (Johnson) Bunche, was an amateur musician; his grandmother, “Nana” Johnson, who lived with the family, had been born into slavery.  When Bunche was ten years old, the family moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico, in the hope that the poor health of his parents would improve in the dry climate.  Both, however, died two years later.  His grandmother, an indomitable woman who appeared Caucasian “on the outside,” but was “all black fervor inside,” took Ralph and his two sisters to live in Los Angeles. There Ralph contributed to the family’s hard pressed finances by selling newspapers, serving as house boy for a movie actor, working for a carpet-laying firm, and doing what odd jobs he could find.

His intellectual brilliance appeared early.  He won a prize in history and another in English upon completion of his elementary school work and was the valedictorian of his graduating class at Jefferson High School in Los Angeles, where he had been a debater and all-around athlete who competed in football, basketball, baseball, and track.  At the University of California at Los Angeles, he supported himself with an athletic scholarship, which paid for his collegiate expenses, and with a janitorial job, which paid for his personal expenses. He played varsity basketball on championship teams, was active in debate and campus journalism, and was graduated in 1927, summa cum laude, valedictorian of his class, with a major in international relations.

With a scholarship granted by Harvard University and a fund of a thousand dollars raised by the black community of Los Angeles, Bunche began his graduate studies in political science.  He completed his master’s degree in 1928 and for the next six years alternated between teaching at Howard University and working toward his doctorate at Harvard.  The Rosenwald Fellowship, which he held in 1932-1933, enabled him to conduct research in Africa for a dissertation comparing French rule in Togoland and Dahomey.  He completed his dissertation in 1934 with such distinction that he was awarded the Toppan Prize for outstanding research in social studies.  From 1936 to 1938, on a Social Science Research Council fellowship, he did postdoctoral research in anthropology at Northwestern University, the London School of Economics, and Capetown University in South Africa.

Throughout his career, Bunche maintained strong ties with education.  He chaired the Department of Political Science at Howard University from 1928 until 1950; taught at Harvard University from 1950 to 1952; served as a member of the New York City Board of Education (1958-1964), as a member of the Board of Overseers of Harvard University (1960-1965), as a member of the Board of the Institute of International Education, and as a trustee of Oberlin College, Lincoln University, and New Lincoln School.

Bunche was always active in the civil rights movement.  At Howard University, he was considered by some as a young radical intellectual who criticized both America’s social system and the established Negro organizations, but generally he is thought of as a moderate.  From his experience as co-director of the Institute of Race Relations at Swarthmore College in 1936, added to his firsthand research performed earlier, he wrote A World View of Race (1936).  He participated in the Carnegie Corporation’s well-known survey of the Negro in America, under the direction of the Swedish sociologist, Gunnar Myrdal, which resulted in the publication of Myrdal’s An American Dilemma (1944).  He was a member of the “Black Cabinet,” consulted on minority problems by Roosevelt’s administration; declined President Truman’s offer of the position of Assistant Secretary of State because of the segregated housing conditions in Washington, D. C.; helped to lead the civil rights march organized by Martin Luther King, Jr., in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1965; supported the action programs of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and of the Urban League.  Bunche did not, himself, form organizations, nor did he aspire to positions of administrative leadership in existing civil rights organizations.  Rather, he exerted his influence personally in speeches and publications, especially during the twenty-year period from 1945 to 1965.  His message was been clear:  Racial prejudice is an unreasoned phenomenon without scientific basis in biology or anthropology; “segregation and democracy are incompatible”; blacks should maintain the struggle for equal rights while accepting the responsibilities that come with freedom; whites must demonstrate that “democracy is color-blind.”

Ralph Bunche’s enduring fame arises from his service to the U. S. government and to the UN.  An adviser to the Department of State and to the military on Africa and colonial areas of strategic military importance during World War II, Bunche moved from his first position as an analyst in the Office of Strategic Services to the desk of Acting Chief of the Division of Dependent Area Affairs in the State Department.  He also discharged various responsibilities in connection with international conferences of the Institute of Pacific Relations, the UN, the International Labor Organization, and the Anglo-American Caribbean Commission.

In 1946, UN Secretary-General Trygve Lie borrowed Bunche from the State Department and placed him in charge of the Department of Trusteeship of the UN to handle problems of the world’s peoples who had not yet attained self-government.

From June of 1947 to August of 1949, Bunche worked on the most important assignment of his career—the confrontation between Arabs and Jews in Palestine.  He was first appointed as Assistant to the UN Special Committee on Palestine, then as Principal Secretary of the UN Palestine Commission, which was charged with carrying out the partition approved by the UN General Assembly.  In early 1948 when this plan was dropped and fighting between Arabs and Israelis became especially severe, the UN appointed Count Folke Bernadotte as Mediator and Ralph Bunche as his Chief Aide.  Four months later, on September 17, 1948, Count Bernadotte was assassinated, and Bunche was named Acting UN Mediator on Palestine.  After eleven months of virtually ceaseless negotiating, Bunche obtained signatures on armistice agreements between Israel and the Arab States.

Bunche returned home to a hero’s welcome.  New York gave him a “ticker tape” parade up Broadway; Los Angeles declared a “Ralph Bunche Day.”  He was besieged with requests to lecture, was awarded the Spingarn Prize by the NAACP in 1949, was given over thirty honorary degrees in the next three years, and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950.

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What are your thoughts on this piece?

 

NOTE FROM JOYCEIf you enjoyed and/or learned from this blog, please leave a comment and send the link to others.  Thanks!!

If you’re interested in reading all about “My Breast Cancer Journey,” those posts start with post #334.

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~ Joyce Fields

 

ADDITIONAL OFFERINGS FROM JOYCE FIELDS

Joyce is an author who has written seven books.  If you enjoy this blog, you will, undoubtedly, enjoy all her books.  Her sister, Anita, is also an author.

BE INSPIRED!  You can read about and order their books AND order merchandise from their online store at this link (or click the “BE INSPIRED!” button above):

https://lineofserenity.wordpress.com/get-more-inspiration/

Thanks for your interest AND support!!

Contact Joyce at goodshortbooks@yahoo.com.

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SOME OF JOYCE’S FAVORITE BLOGS

I visit these blogs and leave comments regularly.  I think you will enjoy them all!

http://www.lenasledgeblog.com  Books, reviews, give-aways, interviews.

http://living4bliss.com  Believing Life Is Set up for Success (BLISS)

http://goss-coaching.com/author/gosscoaching  A professional writer and wellness coach helping people connect thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and action to create optimal health and a vibrant life.

http://www.thebirkineffect.com  Musings of a “want it all” 21st century woman

http://www.thesweetsensations.com  A baking, entertainment, and lifestyle blog.  Fantastic recipes and food photography, too!

http://www.pennilessparenting.com  A rich life on minimum wage.  Plus fabulous, healthful recipes!

 

 

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About Line of Serenity (Joyce Fields)

As a thought leader for today's generation, I choose to be part of the solution and am doing things that positively impact people's lives. In addition to being a happy, married (since 1967!) woman, sister, aunt, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, I have over 40 years' experience in "Corporate America": Stenographer, Secretary, Supervisor, Analyst, Office Manager, Executive Assistant. I am also a professional proofreader and the author of eight books (seven non-fiction; one children's fiction--http://www.GoodShortBooks.com).
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10 Responses to Spreading Good News (Post 522 – BLACK HISTORY MONTH: First African American Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Ralph J. Bunche)

  1. living4bliss says:

    I am so sorry that February is almost over. I was so enjoying your Black History posts.

  2. I loved your blog post.Really looking forward to read more. Fantastic.

  3. Pierce Lahr says:

    A round of applause for your blog post.Thanks Again. Want more.

  4. Hi, Joyce, I just wanted to tell you what a great piece this is on Dr. Bunche. He’s definitely someone that more folks need to know about. BTW I got here looking for a picture of him AND a good bio that I could use on my Black History Every Day Pinterest board.

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